Macionis

Sociology: 17e 2020 update

What’s New in this Edition?

New! More interactive learning with Revel  Digital learning engages students by transforming passive reading into interactive discovery. John Macionis is committed to making all his titles as interactive as possible. In this revision, there are a number of dynamic and interactive features that will increase student interest and learning.

  • Window on the World global maps allow students to compare two maps and see how one variable (such as a nation’s level of economic development) affects another variable (such as gender equality).
  • Seeing Ourselves national maps show national patterns and also invite students to zoom in to explore their own local communities. Students can also compare two maps to see if one variable (such as teenage pregnancy rate) appears to be linked to another (such as the poverty rate).
  • Predictive graphs invite students to estimate social attitudes in the nation’s past or in our projected future and assess their estimate against research results. Many students, for example, underestimate the level of disapproval of same-sex relationships as recently as several decades ago. Similarly, many students overestimate the size of the immigrant population today. Predictive graphs are found at the beginning of each chapter.
  • Interactive assessment is a fun way to check on learning. Each chapter provides a “drag and drop” exercise that invites students to apply sociological theory to the issue at hand.

New! Outstanding videos  John Macionis has selected new, short videos that will draw students into the questions and controversies of our time. Instructors can assign these videos to students and track their viewing or instructors may use these videos to spark lively class discussion.

New! All the Data There are more than 2,000 different statistics in this title. Every one of these statistics has been reviewed and updated to the latest available data. This revision contains the most recent data on inequality of income and wealth, unemployment, crime, health, and other variables. All these data reflect the importance of race, class, and gender.

New! Examples and Illustrations The historical depth of many students is limited to about two years. Recent examples and illustrations found in every chapter ensure the relevance of your course.

Updated! Current Events Bulletins Found at the beginning of each chapter, these news bulletins inform students of recent events and current trends related to the chapter’s focus. John Macionis updates these bulletins several times each year.

Updated! Social Media  Macionis titles have the first full chapter on social media and this relevant chapter has been updated to provide the latest research and controversies surrounding the social media central to the lives of students.

Updated! Power of Society Figures  If you could teach your students only one thing in the introductory course, what would it be? Most instructors would probably answer: “To understand the power of society to shape people’s lives.” Each chapter in this title begins with a Power of Society figure that does exactly that—encouraging students to give up some of their common sense that points to the importance of personal choice by presenting evidence of how society shapes our major life experiences. Examples include how race and schooling guide marriage choices or how class position sets longevity. These figures have been updated for this revision.

Updated! Photography and fine art  The rich program of images in this title has been updated to better reflect current popular culture and to better present the diversity of our society.

Expanded! Scholarship dealing with Race, Class, and Gender  Macionis titles have long been leaders in coverage of the diversity of U.S. society. Analysis of race, class, and gender is included in every chapter. Other dimensions of social difference are sexual identity, including the transgender movement, and disability issues. “Thinking About Diversity: Race, Class, and Gender” boxed features call attention to specific diversity issues, and “Seeing Ourselves” national maps present social patterns highlight rural-urban and regional differences.

Updated! Primary source readings  Each chapter includes access to primary-source readings by notable sociologists that invite students to engage with researchers and analysts.

Fully-Involved Author!  John Macionis is the only author who does it all, providing all the content and personally writing all the assessment questions and all the supplemental material, including the Instructor Resource Manual.

New and Updated Material by Chapter

Chapter 1: The Sociological Perspective

The updated Power of Society figure shows how race, schooling, and age guide people’s selection of marriage partners. Find updates on same-sex marriage, suicide rates by gender and race as well as for all the states, women’s fertility around the world, a socio-economic profile of the world people including the number of low-, middle-, and high-income nations, and the changing share of minority athletes in every major sport. As in every chapter, the photography program has been updated with all captions written by the author. New videos are provided for this chapter. A dozen new research references inform the revised chapter.

Chapter 2: Sociological Investigation

The updated Power of Society figure shows that, among males in their late twenties, whites have double the rate of blacks when it comes to completing college. New research shows us that the richest 5 percent of U.S. families own two-thirds of all wealth just as nearly half of all families have no wealth at all. A new discussion shows that how researchers word questions significantly affects the results they obtain. New videos are included. Twelve new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 3: Culture

Topics that have been updated begin with a number of small societies around the world including the Yąnomamö; the steady loss of global languages; the share of the world’s population speaking Chinese, English, or Spanish as a first or second language; the share of foreign-born people for nations around the world; the share of people speaking a language other than English at home for counties across the United States; and the increasing importance of making money among today’s young people compared to those who came of age in the 1960s. New videos are provided for this chapter. Eleven new research citations support this revised chapter.

Chapter 4: Society

The updated Power of Society figure shows how level of education is a good predictor of people’s access to the internet; the global map  provides an updated look at the unequal use of personal computers for nations around the world. New videos are provided for this chapter.

Chapter 5: Socialization

The updated Power of Society figure links level of schooling to time spent viewing television. There is expanded discussion of the importance of social media to socialization. There are updates on the multiracial share of the U.S. population including a new Seeing Ourselves national map that provides data for counties across the country; and the extent of media exposure by age race, and class; and varying conceptions of childhood around the world. New videos are provided for this chapter. Twenty-two new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 6: Social Interaction in Everyday Life

The updated Power of Society figure shows how age shapes use of social networking. The discussion of gender and smiling includes a new example from the 2016 presidential election. New videos are provided for this chapter. Three new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 7: Mass Media and Social Media

The updated Power of Society figure shows how gender shapes our use of Pinterest and other social media sites. Because social media is a new and rapidly-changing topic, it has been given considerable rewriting in this update for currency and clarity. There is new and expanded discussion of the role of social media in the controversy over foreign governments trying to influence U.S. elections. There is updated and expanded discussion of the concept of “fake news” and media bias; the most popular social-networking sites; the extent of cyber-bullying; and the risk of addiction to social media. New videos as well as a dozen new research references are included in this chapter.

Chapter 8: Groups and Organizations

The updated Power of Society figure shows that, the higher people’s social standing, the greater their opportunity to join professional associations. There are updates on the extent of internet access in communities across the United States, and how race and ethnicity affect holding a management position in private industry. New videos have been added along with eleven new research citations.

Chapter 9: Sexuality and Society

The updated Power of Society figure shows the steady increase in support for same-sex marriage; completing the predictive graphing exercise, students may be surprised to learn that such support was small as recently as the 1980s. The discussion of transgender and cisgender identity has been updated and expanded. There are updates on the extent of premarital sex, extramarital sex, the number of lifetime opposite-sex partners for women and men in the United States, the share of older people who are sexually active, and the extent of contraceptive use in nations around the world. There are also new data on the number of gay people in the U.S. population, the rate of teen pregnancy including a new state-by-state national map, and recent efforts by many state legislatures to restrict access to abortion. New videos are included. Twenty new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 10: Deviance

The updated Power of Society figure demonstrates the racial bias in our society’s application of drug laws. There are updates concerning laws regulating sale of marijuana across the United States, the illustrations of corporate crime, and the number of hate crimes. All the crime statistics—for both violent crimes and property crimes—are the latest available from the Department of Justice. Using these new data, the criminal offense rates by age, gender, and race have all been updated. The discussions of crime and availability of guns have been both updated and expanded. Capital punishment laws for nations around the world have been updated. Coverage of recidivism and the death penalty has been revised with new data. Twenty-five new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 11: Social Stratification

The updated Power of Society figure confirms the importance of class by showing substantial differences in life expectancy for a rich and a poor county in northern Florida. There are updates on life within a low-income community in South Africa, changes to the royal family in Britain, the state of women in Japan’s corporate economy, and how China’s increasing economic power is changing social inequality in that nation. Data comparing the degree of economic inequality in the United States to that of other high-income nations has been updated and includes a global map showing Gini coefficients for all nations. Ten new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 12: Social Class in the United States

The updated Power of Society figure shows how various categories of people have very different odds of experiencing poverty; the predictive graphing exercise allows students to test their assessment of those odds. The revised chapter has all the latest data on inequality of income and wealth clearly profiling the economic resources of people at all levels of our society and also patterns of social mobility. There are updates for assessment of occupational prestige; levels of educational achievement; economic resources analyzed by race, ethnicity, and gender; and analysis of class levels among all U.S. families now has the latest statistics. The Seeing Ourselves national map now provides interactive access to household income for all counties of the nation. There is new and expanded discussion assessing the reality of the American dream. Analysis of poverty in the United States has been updated with the latest statistics and includes an interactive national map of poverty rates for all counties. Data on homelessness is now the latest available. There are new videos. Twenty new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 13: Global Stratification

The updated Power of Society figure presents dramatic differences in survival for those born in low- and high-income nations; the predictive graphing exercise allows students to assess their own attitude about the link between wealth and health. There is an updated list of the world’s richest people showing that their combined wealth equals the total economic output of ninety-seven countries. New data on low-, middle-, and high-income nations now reflect the movement of China into the high-income category, which greatly shifts the numbers. All data on the distribution of global income and wealth have been updated, along with data on quality of life and global poverty. Find new videos as well as fifteen new research citations that support this revised chapter.

Chapter 14: Gender Stratification

The updated Power of Society figure gives a fresh look at how gender shapes the way we prioritize work and family life. There are new data in a global map contrasting women’s social standing compared to that of men. Revision updates include data on gender and schooling, presentation of gender in the mass media, and the link between gender and work. New data have reformed the discussions of gender and inequality of income and wealth. Coverage of the importance of the 2018 elections for gender balance in Congress has been added. A freshened Seeing Ourselves national map shows the share of women legislators for all states after the 2018 elections. The latest data drive discussion of violence directed against women and men. Thirty new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 15: Race and Ethnicity

This revised chapter contains updates on the racial and ethnic classifications used by the U.S. Census Bureau and the size and share of all racial and ethnic categories within the nation’s population. A series of updated Seeing Ourselves national maps shows the minority share of the population for all counties in the country and invites students to interact with the map to explore the minority populations of their local community. There are updates on racial segregation, the average age of people in various racial and ethnic categories, and median family income and college completion rates for all major racial and ethnic categories of the population. New videos have been included. Fourteen new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 16:  Aging and the Elderly

The update Power of Society figure provides a recent measure of the care to elderly family members provided by women and men; the predictive graphing exercise allows student to test their own attitudes about gender and caregiving. There are new data on the elder share of the U.S. population, self-assessment of health by older people, life expectancy around the world, living arrangements for the elderly, poverty for the elderly and younger populations, and income and poverty rates across the life cycle. The latest state laws concerning physician-assisted suicide are provided. An updated Seeing Ourselves national map shows the elder share of population for all the counties across the country and this interactive map invites students to explore aging in their own community. A dozen new research citations have reshaped this revised chapter.

Chapter 17:  The Economy and Work

The updated Power of Society figure shows how race and ethnicity shape the types of job people have. There are updates of the size of the three sectors of the U.S. economy and two Window on the World global maps provide this information for all countries. New data track the changing size of the three sectors over time right up to 2018. Additional updates focus on the state of labor unions in the United States and around the world, the rate of self-employment for women and men, levels of unemployment (including 2019 data) for various categories of the population, and the size and power of the corporate economy. There is a new section on automation and its effects on the labor force. Twenty-one new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 18: Politics and Government

This revised chapter has new discussion of increasing political polarization. Find updates on the richest members of the Trump administration, the relative size of government in various high-income nations, where college students and all adults in the United States place themselves on the political spectrum, political party identification, spending by political campaigns, voter apathy, changes to laws restricting voting rights of convicted felons, the number of terrorist attacks around the world and their human toll, and the costs of militarism in the United States and globally. Recent data assess the extent of political freedom in countries around the world including an updated Window on the World global map. Fifteen new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 19: Families

A new Power of Society figure shows the correlation between marriage and higher social standing. There are updates on the number of U.S. households and the declining share that conforms to the Census Bureau’s definition of a “family,” the increasing age at first marriage, the increasing share of marriages that are multiracial, the declining divorce rate, the level of violence against women and children, and the increasing number of extended family households. New data shows the consequences of economic inequality among racial and ethnic categories of the U.S. population for family form. The updated Window on the World global map shows that laws supporting same-sex marriage have become common only in western nations. Twenty-seven new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 20: Religion

This revised chapter updates religious identification both within the United States and around the world including a series of Window on the World global maps. There are new data on the increasing share of the U.S. population that claims no religious identity, correlations between religious identification and social class, and the rising level of secularization on the campus. Seven new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 21: Education

The updated Power of Society figure shows the strong correlation between race and ethnicity and the share of young people enrolled in college. There are updates on illiteracy around the world; educational achievement in the United States; the share of U.S. students attending private, parochial, and public schools; the link between family income and college enrollment; the average lifetime earnings for people with varying levels of schooling; the increasing importance of community colleges, especially to minority communities; and rates of dropping out by ethnicity and race. There is also updated discussion of the school choice debate and the teacher strikes during 2018 and 2019 over pay and class size. Twenty-five new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 22: Health and Medicine

The updated Power of Society figure tracks increasing obesity rates for minority and non-minority categories of the U.S. population. There is new and expanded discussion of the opioid epidemic. An updated Window on the World global map shows infant mortality rates for nations around the world and students can interact with two maps to see the effect of level of a nation’s economic development on health. A second, updated global map shows the levels of HIV infections around the world. The first updated Seeing Ourselves national map shows life expectancy for all counties across the United States and allows students to explore their own community. The second map shows increases in obesity rates by state between 1996 and 2017. There is new and expanded discussion of the hazards of vaping. Other updates include ranked causes of death in the United States; data linking income and race to health; the high costs to human health of cigarette smoking; new data showing the extent of socialized medicine in various high-income nations; and updated discussion of how people pay for health care. Twenty-eight new research citations support this revised chapter.

Chapter 23: Population, Urbanization, and the Environment

The updated Power of Society figure shows varying levels of concern about global warming within the populations of nations around the world. There is updated discussion of climate policy in the United States. All demographic data—on fertility, mortality, and population increase—have been updated. An updated Window on the world global map shows population change in all the world’s nations. Other updates include trends in U.S. urbanization, including the increasing minority population of cities and the nation as a whole; the increasing amount of waste being placed in landfills; the increasing shortage of clean water; the shrinking of the rain forests; and the latest projections about climate change. Twenty-two new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 24: Collective Behavior and Social Movements

The revised chapter contains new examples and illustrations including the Mueller investigation and ongoing healthcare debate in Congress. There are updates ranging from changing laws regulating cell phone use in automobiles to the extent of activism among today’s college students.  Six new research citations inform this revised chapter.

Chapter 25 Social Change: Traditional, Modern, and Postmodern Societies

The updated Seeing Ourselves national map shows population change for counties across the United States and invites students to interact with the map to explore their own community. There are updates on the share of parents who do not expect their children to have lives better than their own, and examples and illustrations are updated to maintain currency. Fifteen new research citations inform this revised chapter.